Emma Fryer: Middle School Special Education Teacher at MS 363, The Academy For Personal Leadership and Excellence in the Bronx
What was the highlight of your day? There was a really good flow today in one of the struggling classes. It’s really nice when everyone is working at their fullest capacity. I’ve been working really hard developing a new lesson plan template.  What do you like most about teaching? Picking kids’ brains apart to find the best way for them to access the curriculum.
Meet Me After School: a photo essay by Rebecca Klein, at Huffington Post
Take a moment with some New York teachers and hear about the highlights of their working days. One thing they have in common at the hour the kids have gone home: they look exhausted, but proud.

Emma Fryer: Middle School Special Education Teacher at MS 363, The Academy For Personal Leadership and Excellence in the Bronx

What was the highlight of your day? There was a really good flow today in one of the struggling classes. It’s really nice when everyone is working at their fullest capacity. I’ve been working really hard developing a new lesson plan template.

What do you like most about teaching? Picking kids’ brains apart to find the best way for them to access the curriculum.

Meet Me After School: a photo essay by Rebecca Klein, at Huffington Post

Take a moment with some New York teachers and hear about the highlights of their working days. One thing they have in common at the hour the kids have gone home: they look exhausted, but proud.

285 reblog from Ashley Morris. hardstreetsoforangecounty:

Caption: Gov. Jerry Brown, pictured here after vetoing the 2011 state budget, signed a bill to transfer responsibility for many California felons from state prisons to county jails.
Photo By: Los Angeles Times
This photograph depicts Governor Jerry Brown vetoing the 2001 state budget. The actual image of Jerry Brown is not artistic, in angle or in coloring, but the specific cropping of this picture does increase its visual value. The cropping of this picture to only include a small portion of Jerry Brown’s face, indicates a person feeling of accountability in relation to the state of the bill’s success or failure, and his involvement in the matter. The photograph also depicts the United States flag behind Brown, possibly indicating his responsibilities to the American people in all of his decisions, especially the one he is deciding on presently. An abstract interpretation I have of this photograph is of his finger coordination in addition to the placement of his head, it is almost as though there is a literal statement of “small mindedness” that he is portraying.
This article discusses the effects that the AB 109 law or prison realignment law had on the L.A counties. The article concludes that the law, in releasing felons early to help with the overcrowding issues, was seen as a complete failure as most of the felons recommitted crimes within the year including rape, attempted murder, and burglary. The author  goes on to describe how the realignment act does not “let prisoners out early” but rather only changes the person in which the prisoner, once out on parole, goes to check in with. The author explains the intentional misunderstanding of this law as political propaganda that hinders future attempts at creating prison reforms.

285 reblog from Ashley Morris. hardstreetsoforangecounty:

Caption: Gov. Jerry Brown, pictured here after vetoing the 2011 state budget, signed a bill to transfer responsibility for many California felons from state prisons to county jails.

Photo By: Los Angeles Times

This photograph depicts Governor Jerry Brown vetoing the 2001 state budget. The actual image of Jerry Brown is not artistic, in angle or in coloring, but the specific cropping of this picture does increase its visual value. The cropping of this picture to only include a small portion of Jerry Brown’s face, indicates a person feeling of accountability in relation to the state of the bill’s success or failure, and his involvement in the matter. The photograph also depicts the United States flag behind Brown, possibly indicating his responsibilities to the American people in all of his decisions, especially the one he is deciding on presently. An abstract interpretation I have of this photograph is of his finger coordination in addition to the placement of his head, it is almost as though there is a literal statement of “small mindedness” that he is portraying.

This article discusses the effects that the AB 109 law or prison realignment law had on the L.A counties. The article concludes that the law, in releasing felons early to help with the overcrowding issues, was seen as a complete failure as most of the felons recommitted crimes within the year including rape, attempted murder, and burglary. The author  goes on to describe how the realignment act does not “let prisoners out early” but rather only changes the person in which the prisoner, once out on parole, goes to check in with. The author explains the intentional misunderstanding of this law as political propaganda that hinders future attempts at creating prison reforms.

285 reblog from Elizabeth Popp: energypopp:

Under a law passed in 2012, doctors in Pennsylvania can access information on chemicals used during the fracking process, but cannot share this information with their patients or the public.  The law states:

"companies must disclose the identity and amount of any chemicals used in fracking fluids to any health professional that requests that information in order to diagnosis or treat a patient that may have been exposed to a hazardous chemical. But the [stipulation] in the new bill requires those health professionals to sign a confidentiality agreement stating that they will not disclose that information to anyone else — not even the person they’re trying to treat."  (Source)

There is good reason to be concerned about what’s in those fluids. A 2010 congressional investigation revealed that Halliburton and other fracking companies had used 32 million gallons of diesel products, which include toxic chemicals like benzene, toluene, and xylene, among others, in the fluids they inject into the ground. Low levels of exposure to those chemicals can trigger acute effects like headaches, dizziness, and drowsiness, while higher levels of exposure can cause cancer.  Dave Masur, director of PennEnvironemt, worries that a lawsuit from major drilling companies will be reason for doctors to avoid breaking the confidentiality agreement.

"People are claiming that animals are dying and people are getting sick in clusters around [drilling wells], but we can’t really study it because we can’t see what’s actually in the product." — Senator Daylin Leach.

At the federal level, natural gas developers have long been allowed to keep the mixture of chemicals they use in fracking fluid a secret from the general public, protecting it as “proprietary information” like McDonald’s “Special Sauce” or Mr. Krab’s “Secret Formula” on Spongebob Squarepants.  The industry is also exempt from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory.  This program that ensures that communities are given information about what companies are releasing into the environment.  In 2005 the industry successfully lobbied for an exemption from EPA regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act as well, in what is often referred to as the “Halliburton Loophole.” In recent years, the Obama EPA has pressed drillers to voluntarily provide more information about fracking fluids, but the industry has largely rebuffed those appeals.

(Source)

285 reblog from Elizabeth Popp: energypopp:

Under a law passed in 2012, doctors in Pennsylvania can access information on chemicals used during the fracking process, but cannot share this information with their patients or the public.  The law states:

"companies must disclose the identity and amount of any chemicals used in fracking fluids to any health professional that requests that information in order to diagnosis or treat a patient that may have been exposed to a hazardous chemical. But the [stipulation] in the new bill requires those health professionals to sign a confidentiality agreement stating that they will not disclose that information to anyone else — not even the person they’re trying to treat."  (Source)

There is good reason to be concerned about what’s in those fluids. A 2010 congressional investigation revealed that Halliburton and other fracking companies had used 32 million gallons of diesel products, which include toxic chemicals like benzene, toluene, and xylene, among others, in the fluids they inject into the ground. Low levels of exposure to those chemicals can trigger acute effects like headaches, dizziness, and drowsiness, while higher levels of exposure can cause cancer.  Dave Masur, director of PennEnvironemt, worries that a lawsuit from major drilling companies will be reason for doctors to avoid breaking the confidentiality agreement.

"People are claiming that animals are dying and people are getting sick in clusters around [drilling wells], but we can’t really study it because we can’t see what’s actually in the product." — Senator Daylin Leach.

At the federal level, natural gas developers have long been allowed to keep the mixture of chemicals they use in fracking fluid a secret from the general public, protecting it as “proprietary information” like McDonald’s “Special Sauce” or Mr. Krab’s “Secret Formula” on Spongebob Squarepants.  The industry is also exempt from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory.  This program that ensures that communities are given information about what companies are releasing into the environment.  In 2005 the industry successfully lobbied for an exemption from EPA regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act as well, in what is often referred to as the “Halliburton Loophole.” In recent years, the Obama EPA has pressed drillers to voluntarily provide more information about fracking fluids, but the industry has largely rebuffed those appeals.

(Source)

Fashion: an innovative way to raise public awareness of the toxic groundwater pollution in Appalachia. Here’s the Kiva (microloan) page for Appalachia Mud Shirts, a company that aims to dye shirts with the toxic runoff of an abandoned mine.

Appalachia Mud Shirts add value to blank garments by utilizing abandoned mine runoff. The runoff contains unnaturally high levels of minerals as a result of past mining activities. The runoff is locally refereed to as “Appalachia Mud”. Via a chemical process the pigments for the dyes are produced from the minerals contained in the runoff. The resulting byproducts are a neutral and more environmental friendly discharge. The dying of each garment directly affects local watersheds by diverting and treating several gallons of runoff. Additionally our garments help raise environmental awareness around the Abandoned Mine Runoff issue in the Appalachia Region.

Fashion: an innovative way to raise public awareness of the toxic groundwater pollution in Appalachia. Here’s the Kiva (microloan) page for Appalachia Mud Shirts, a company that aims to dye shirts with the toxic runoff of an abandoned mine.

Appalachia Mud Shirts add value to blank garments by utilizing abandoned mine runoff. The runoff contains unnaturally high levels of minerals as a result of past mining activities. The runoff is locally refereed to as “Appalachia Mud”. Via a chemical process the pigments for the dyes are produced from the minerals contained in the runoff. The resulting byproducts are a neutral and more environmental friendly discharge. The dying of each garment directly affects local watersheds by diverting and treating several gallons of runoff. Additionally our garments help raise environmental awareness around the Abandoned Mine Runoff issue in the Appalachia Region.

Emily Schiffer, Securing Food In Chicagoland. 2011

Schiffer’s photographs document a range of urban agriculture projects in the South Side of Chicago. Above and beyond the organic food they provide for their community, programs like Retraining the World Veterans Center (top), and the Center for Urban Transformation (bottom) bring people together to restore a sense of common purpose. Schiffer writes:

Chicago is one of those places where you can see recent U.S. history sprawled out before you, linear-timeline-style. From Industrialization to The Great Migration, to Redlining, to institutional segregation, to the refusal of banks to invest in black areas, to the departure of industry—the local economy, emotional empowerment, physical health and education have been stunted. Food security connects with the aforementioned issues, and is one way of examining the larger context.

The more time I spent in Chicago, the clearer it became that the solution to food security requires more than just food. At grocery stores, I saw shopping carts overflowing with processed products, regardless of whether the store sold fruit and vegetables.  Conversely, I visited community gardens and witnessed the profound power of gardening to inspire healthy living, reduce stress and connect those involved with a larger purpose.

See more at Schiffer’s site and at Time Lightbox.

Drilling Is Just the Beginning:Range Resources’s feel-good media campaign. Draw your own conclusions.

Replies on twitter to the graphic posted above included “Yes, drilling is just the beginning: poisoned groundwater will last a whole lot longer” … and “If Marcellus were a country, we would have “liberated” it by now.”

(footnote: still working on getting a tweet to embed. I would like to note that I did not elect to follow @Range_Resources; their tweets just started showing up in my feed. Wonder why.)

When I was about six or seven my father died. This was either the worst or best thing that ever happened to me. In fact, now that I think about it, it was both. That experience was both my blessing and my curse. I don’t remember much before the death of my father. For me it feels like that’s when life as I know it really began. It’s not like I was saddened by the event. I hardly knew my father. His memory only survives in my head because of three scenarios: the way his coarse mustache pricked my cheek when he kissed me, the short collect calls he made from the correctional facility, and the photos that my mother keeps under her bed. After his death my mother became incredibly detached. She became a mere exoskeleton of her former self. With a dead father and a deeply depressed mother who basically stopped living, I had no choice but to take care of myself. I became as self-reliant as possible. There was no more time for childhood. I was all about business. Thanks to the death of my father I learned to value independence, hard work, and maturity. This is my blessing. Thanks to the death of my father I grew up much too fast and never learned how to ask anyone for help. I carry my own burdens…alone. This is my curse.
Photo: Dawoud Bey, Kevin, 2005. From the book Class Pictures (Aperture, 2007). Image courtesy Aperture Foundation.
The strategy of Dawoud Bey’s Class Pictures project is a simple one: Slow down. Be still. Listen.
Each large-format portrait presents us with a single person, aged somewhere in their teens, in the school environment they know well. Each is accompanied by what the subject chose to write about themselves. The photographs are remarkable for their calm dignity; all the more surprising as we find out more about the lives the kids live, and the schools that have brought them together. To look at the photographs is to remember how important it was for us as teenagers to simply have someone hear us out.
See photographs with captions at Milwaukee Art Museum
Read Bey’s statement on the project and see more photographs at DawoudBey.net

When I was about six or seven my father died. This was either the worst or best thing that ever happened to me. In fact, now that I think about it, it was both. That experience was both my blessing and my curse. I don’t remember much before the death of my father. For me it feels like that’s when life as I know it really began. It’s not like I was saddened by the event. I hardly knew my father. His memory only survives in my head because of three scenarios: the way his coarse mustache pricked my cheek when he kissed me, the short collect calls he made from the correctional facility, and the photos that my mother keeps under her bed. After his death my mother became incredibly detached. She became a mere exoskeleton of her former self. With a dead father and a deeply depressed mother who basically stopped living, I had no choice but to take care of myself. I became as self-reliant as possible. There was no more time for childhood. I was all about business. Thanks to the death of my father I learned to value independence, hard work, and maturity. This is my blessing. Thanks to the death of my father I grew up much too fast and never learned how to ask anyone for help. I carry my own burdens…alone. This is my curse.

Photo: Dawoud Bey, Kevin, 2005. From the book Class Pictures (Aperture, 2007). Image courtesy Aperture Foundation.

The strategy of Dawoud Bey’s Class Pictures project is a simple one: Slow down. Be still. Listen.

Each large-format portrait presents us with a single person, aged somewhere in their teens, in the school environment they know well. Each is accompanied by what the subject chose to write about themselves. The photographs are remarkable for their calm dignity; all the more surprising as we find out more about the lives the kids live, and the schools that have brought them together. To look at the photographs is to remember how important it was for us as teenagers to simply have someone hear us out.

See photographs with captions at Milwaukee Art Museum

Read Bey’s statement on the project and see more photographs at DawoudBey.net

In Search of: 1970s Sitcom Single Moms
Remember Alice? Or Bonnie Franklin in One Day at a Time? Those 1970s TV moms who were always striving to keep it together for their kids? Times have changed and women in America, as a whole, have more opportunity for success than thirty years ago. But there’s a huge element of American society that doesn’t get much screen time: the families of the ever-growing struggling class. Here’s an article that asks: How is it that the working moms on TV today all seem to have it all?

In stark contrast, today’s best-known TV single moms are awash in power and money. They are well-heeled law partners like Alicia, successful Lexus-driving entrepreneurs with heated swimming pools like Jules Cobb (“Cougartown”) and “real-life” McMansion-dwelling divorcees with no clear jobs but endless available hours for spa treatments (The Real Housewives of Pick-Your-Locale). Yes, there’s even a United States vice president, Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, our TV nation’s No. 2 (Veep).
Yes, it’s undoubtedly a sign of progress that television’s single moms haven’t been relegated to perennial hard-luck story lines: As real-life women have broken professional boundaries, on-screen moms have, too.
But the virtual absence of the other side of the economic spectrum is glaring, particularly since the number of real mothers living with financial struggles is staggering. According to this year’s Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back From the Brink, released by Maria Shriver and the Center for American Progress, 70 million American women and the children who depend on them live in poverty or just on the edge of it.

Caption: Linda Lavin and Philip McKeon in Alice, Courtesy of Everett Collection
Read more: In Search of: 1970s Sitcom Single Moms | C-Notes | OZY

In Search of: 1970s Sitcom Single Moms

Remember Alice? Or Bonnie Franklin in One Day at a Time? Those 1970s TV moms who were always striving to keep it together for their kids? Times have changed and women in America, as a whole, have more opportunity for success than thirty years ago. But there’s a huge element of American society that doesn’t get much screen time: the families of the ever-growing struggling class. Here’s an article that asks: How is it that the working moms on TV today all seem to have it all?

In stark contrast, today’s best-known TV single moms are awash in power and money. They are well-heeled law partners like Alicia, successful Lexus-driving entrepreneurs with heated swimming pools like Jules Cobb (“Cougartown”) and “real-life” McMansion-dwelling divorcees with no clear jobs but endless available hours for spa treatments (The Real Housewives of Pick-Your-Locale). Yes, there’s even a United States vice president, Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, our TV nation’s No. 2 (Veep).

Yes, it’s undoubtedly a sign of progress that television’s single moms haven’t been relegated to perennial hard-luck story lines: As real-life women have broken professional boundaries, on-screen moms have, too.

But the virtual absence of the other side of the economic spectrum is glaring, particularly since the number of real mothers living with financial struggles is staggering. According to this year’s Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back From the Brink, released by Maria Shriver and the Center for American Progress, 70 million American women and the children who depend on them live in poverty or just on the edge of it.

Caption: Linda Lavin and Philip McKeon in Alice, Courtesy of Everett Collection
Read more: In Search of: 1970s Sitcom Single Moms | C-Notes | OZY

A glimpse of photography that reminds us of our common humanity. From AP Images:

Anja Niedringhaus, 48, an internationally acclaimed German photographer who worked for The Associated Press, was killed when an Afghan policeman opened fire while she and AP correspondent Kathy Gannon were sitting in their car in eastern Afghanistan.

Niedringhaus joined the AP in 2002, and while based in Geneva worked throughout the Middle East as well as Afghanistan and Pakistan. She was part of the AP team that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for coverage of Iraq. She also covered nine Olympic Games and other sports events around the world.

(Source: youtube.com)

285 reblog from Billy Price. It’s interesting in the third photograph how we see the colliding of two worlds, with the lady in the suit observing the anguish of the woman in her living room. The picture seems to call on a long history of Appalachians being wary of outsiders coming in to take advantage of their isolation and poverty.

bprice1037:

Photographer: Brian Cohen

These photographs were obtained from Brian Cohen’s personal photography page, which contained the Marcellus Shale project. This project is being taken on by many photographers in order to help the movement against fracking. 

This project is more effective than just a single photo graph for numerous reasons. To start, more than one photograph can cover more than one area of the tracking movement. For instance, a whole group of photos can cover the actual fracking sites, the environment around it that is affected, the people affected, and numerous other aspects.The mass amounts of photos also have a higher chance of getting into people’s everyday lives as opposed to just one photo.

See the whole collection of photos here.